New LGBT Resource Center Director

Chad Mandala named Director of the LGBT Resource Center

Chad Mandala named Director of the LGBT Resource Center

Chad Mandala named Director of the LGBT Resource Center

Chad Mandala, who currently directs the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Resource Center at Texas A&M University, has been named director of the LGBT Resource Center at the University of Georgia.

Mandala will facilitate the development, implementation and evaluation of educational, social, support and resource programs for students regarding topics of sexual orientation and gender identity and serve as an advocate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students on the University of Georgia campus and beyond. He will report to Associate Vice President for Student Affairs Michele Howard and serve as a member of the leadership team for the Division of Student Affairs.

“Chad’s experience at institutions, particularly in the Southeast, similar to UGA in size and prestige, as well as his scholarly research and involvement in student affairs professional associations at the national level make him an excellent addition to our campus," said Victor K. Wilson, vice president for student affairs. “I’m excited for the future of the LGBT Resource Center and continuing to enhance our support for our students.”

Mandala’s appointment is effective December 10.

In this role, Mandala will serve as a primary point of contact and support for students on topics related to sexual orientation and gender identity, provide referral services for students needing assistance from campus and off-campus resources, and act as a resource for every member of the University of Georgia community - including parents, incoming students and alumni seeking assistance.

He will lead the LGBT Resource Center staff in implementing educational awareness and learning programs, as well as provide administrative support and leadership for many campus-wide programming initiatives. He will also assist with advising Lambda Alliance and other student organizations supported by the Resource Center.

Mandala desires to enhance understanding and assist the university in providing a strong commitment to supporting its students.

“I want to help students uncover how they can best use their gifts to serve the world,” Mandala said. “In doing so, we can create the most impactful forms of student engagement a university can offer.”

Mandala brings a wide range of experience in student affairs. He previously worked at Virginia Tech as the advisor for the United Council of Fraternities and Sororities as well as the residential learning coordinator for fraternity and sorority housing. At Texas A&M, he built an impressive record of fundraising and alumni engagement in addition to demonstrating strong administrative, budgetary and supervisory experience.

Nationally, he has contributed to the field with published scholarly research and presentations related to gender identity and expression. Additionally, he previously served on the American College Personnel Association’s standing committee for graduate students and new professionals as website and webinar coordinator, then vice chair for operations, and finally as chair from 2015 to 2017. Since 2016, he has served as a voting member of ACPA’s governing board.

Mandala earned his Master of Science in higher education administration from Florida State University and his Bachelor of Arts in English and theatre studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is currently pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy in sociology from Texas A&M University.

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LGBTRC Listservs

Student Profile: Danny McArthur

Danny McArthur 

Bachelor of Art (Journalism) 2019 

Minor(s): African American and Women’s Studies

LGBT Resource Center Ambassador 2017 - 2018

LGBT Resource Center Office Assistant 2016 - 2019 


It wasn't until college that I learned about intersectionality in PRISM, a discussion group for LGBTQ students of color at UGA. I was fortune enough to befriend a few other queer black people in my residence hall who encouraged me to go to PRISM, and for the first time in my life I didn’t feel weird for about who I was. I realized that I didn’t have to fragment myself to explain my different identities. I could be black, queer, a Christian, and a woman without any of those conflicting with each other. They were all important to me, and knowing I no longer had to choose made it easier for me to disregard falling in or outside of norms by creating my own definition of what was the norm for me. I continued attending the meetings whenever my friends invited me. I also wrote for the school newspaper, and it wasn’t until a story assignment about the history of the LGBT Resource Center where I would be inspired to get more involved. I remember talking to one of the LGBT Ambassadors, someone in Lambda Alliance, and finally the director of the center, Meg Evans, where I decided I wanted to work there. I can’t even remember all what Meg told me, but I decided that afternoon that I was going to apply to be an Office Assistant, so I could work in the Center.

After I was hired and started working at the Center, I decided to be as involved as much as I could. I went to as many Lambda Alliance and PRISM meetings as I could. I think that year was when I really got comfortable with my identities, right up to the point where I didn’t mind sharing them. I started doing the Speaker’s Bureau panels  through Lambda Alliance and talking about my experience as a queer black woman. I was able to be Safe Space trained through being an Ambassador and learned how to better my language to be more inclusive. I made a lot of new friends at the Center who made me start questioning the complexity of labels – at the time, I identified as pansexual, but I was starting to feel uncertain about if that label fit me. At the same time, I felt insecure about changing labels, since I worried doing so would make people doubt my queerness or see my identity as invalid. It would be at a talk with Robyn Ochs where I realized that labels didn’t mean the same for different people, and it reminded me to be comfortable with the idea of sexuality being fluid. I would also participate in other educational opportunities such as Ignite, a social justice retreat. There, I met so many other people involved in social justice work on campus, as well as someone who also identified as a queer Christian woman. It inspired me to want to be more proactive in my advocacy work for the LGBT community.

After seeing how the LGBT Ambassadors were able to have a more direct role in advocating across campus, I decided to apply for it. Even just applying to be an Ambassador proved that I was ready to start living life as an openly gay woman. I came out to my mother that summer, something that I would have never imagined doing prior to working at the Resource Center. It showed me how far I had come in my own journey; I had gone from being ashamed and secretive about who I was to taking pride in it.

While being an LGBT Ambassador my junior year, I was finally able to do the advocacy work I had wanted to do when I first applied to work at the Center. I loved the responsibility that came with the role. The weekly meetings to plan made me appreciate the difficult politics it took to advocate for the LGBT community in an institutional setting, but it also made me appreciate the work that we did. I loved participating in panels and being able to help plan programming. It also helped that I was part of a team that challenged me to think about queerness outside of my experiences with it. It was no longer about me figuring out my own queerness, since at this point I identified solidly as a Southern black lesbian Christian woman whose gender presentation varied wildly among the masculine and feminine. Instead, I was having conversations with other people about what queerness meant to them and educating people on issues within the community. Being an Ambassador also made me rethink leadership. It has been one of the few opportunities where I have been encouraged to acknowledge places where I am weak and allow someone more knowledgeable than me to speak. It was useful in reminding me to not take my minority status for granted to speak for other communities.

Now that my time as an LGBT Ambassador is ending and I am entering my final year at UGA, I am working on integrating the experiences that I have had as an Ambassador into my other work. I don’t know what that will look like, aside from the fact that I now am more social justice oriented than I was before, and I want to continue that work. I know for certain that I don’t want to go back to living life in the closet. I want to continue to be a voice for my community, and I hope to be able to do that. 

Student Profile

Student Profiles were created to celebrate and share the stories of the the students that are involved with the LGBT Resource Center through our programs, student groups, or other initiatives. Students are selected by a team of LGBTQ student leaders and staff from the LGBT Resource Center. Learn more about out students through their experiences. 


Logan. M. Riddle, Bachelor of Science (2018) & Master of Science (2022)

Vidalia, Georgia


Danny McArthur, Bachlor of Arts (2019) 

McRae, Georgia

Student Profile: Logan M. Riddle

Logan M. Riddle 

Bachelor of Science (Psycology) 2018

Master of Education (Professional Counseling (Mental Health Counseling)) 2020

LGBT Resource Center Ambassador 2016-2017

LGBT Resource Center Senior Ambassador 2017-2018


Having been an undergraduate student at UGA for about five years now, it’s interesting to think back to being a freshman and all the changes I’ve been through, both in my academic and personal life.  Freshman year, I was an art major and Spanish minor.  I was going to be a concept and/or freelance artist and become fluent in Spanish as kind of a back-up skill.  That…didn’t last long.  By the end of the year, I decided to change my major to English to pursue becoming an English teacher (which didn’t even last two weeks of my sophomore year before I changed to psychology, with the intent of becoming a therapist).  My experiences as an art major and as a freshman are so separate from what I’ve experienced since then that it’s almost like a different life.  I think it was a different life, in a way.  Having changed my major, I spent all of my time on a completely separate part of campus than the year before.  Instead of spending all my time on East Campus in the art school, I was now spending most of my time in the Tate area (MLC, Fine Arts, and Psychology mainly).  Not only had my on-campus environment changed, but I had also moved into an apartment off campus with a couple of friends and started an off campus part-time job (which, almost four years later, I still have today).  I had a new level of freedom but also responsibility, and it was great.

Despite the fact that these new changes were positive, I still didn’t have a social life outside of my roommates.  Being queer (I identify as lesbian/gay/queer) had become a pretty salient part of my identity at this point in my life, but I still hadn’t had much exposure to other queer students and folks in general (at least in the “real world,” away from the internet).  I didn’t have a community.  Freshman year, I had seen a little bit of information about the LGBT Resource Center and the LGBTQ+ and allied undergraduate student group, Lambda Alliance, but I was too scared to go to any of the events by myself and never asked my roommate to go with me.  Fall of sophomore year, I met my best friend, and without them, I would not be where I am today.

I think the first LGBTRC event I attended was the drag show that fall with my new friend.  It was such a fantastic and emotional experience.  I had never been in a room where I knew that everyone in it either shared my identity, was a part of my community, or was supportive of us.

While I had such a positive experience, I still didn’t want to attend any of the LGBTRC or Lambda events by myself.  Anytime I did attend an event, I went with my best friend.  Spring 2015, we went to Queer Trivia Night and the Connect Conference.  The Connect Conference was the first time I heard about the LGBTRC Ambassador Program.  I was immediately drawn to it and considered applying.  I knew if I was accepted, I would be forced to be more involved and meet more people.  Knowing myself, I knew I would need that push.  So I applied.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get the position, but that was okay.  A year rolled around, I went to a couple more events, and after the Connect Conference of 2016, I decided to try and apply again.  I got an interview, and then I got accepted!

I remember looking around the room when the 2016-2017 LGBTRC Ambassadors gathered for the first time to meet and seeing these strange faces, trying to conceptualize that I would get to know these people, and probably pretty well, over the course of the following year.  Would we get along?  Would we all like each other?  Would we be friends?  Yes, yes, and yes.  The people in this group were and still are incredible.  I relate the dynamic between us to my experiences in high school with drama.  Every year, the cast and crew would become a family, and even though we all went our separate ways when the play was over, we still had that connection.  That’s how I feel with this group.  Even though we’re all in different places in life now, we are still a message away from each other if any of us needs support.

As spring semester 2017 was wrapping up, I was asked by one of my supervisors to return the following year as the Senior Ambassador.  This was a new position, and I would be helping them to figure out what the role entailed and how it would fit into the program.  Since then, I have been serving as a mentor to the new round of Ambassadors but have also worked closely with our supervisors, Senior Coordinator Rashad Small and Graduate Assistant Olivia Tran, with planning events, programs, and the weekly Ambassador class that focuses on leadership skills and identity discussions.  I have also served on the Division of Student Affairs Student Advisory Board once a month with other student leaders in Student Affairs.  This role has not only allowed me to connect with more students, developing many friendships and being a part of a community, but also to develop professional connections with faculty and staff that have helped me to further my academic career.  I have learned skills I never would have learned otherwise from communication to organizational.  I have also obtained a large support system.  I know everyone involved with the Resource Center is there for me if I need them.

I have recently been accepted into the Professional Counseling program here at UGA for graduate school, and although I may have been accepted without being a part of the Ambassador program, I really do believe that the program equipped me with the skills to get through the application and interview process easier than it would have been otherwise.  One of the best things about being accepted into this program is that I will be able to continue being involved with the Resource Center on campus, this time as a graduate student.  The center means a lot to me.  I’ve seen the ways it’s changed and grown over the last few years, and I’m so excited to see how it continues to do so over the next couple years.  My UGA experience revolves around my involvement with the Resource Center, and I encourage anyone who has the ability to get involved with an organization or something else on campus that you’re passionate about.  It’s very fulfilling and will benefit you not only in your academic life but in your future career and your personal life as well.

#LGBTQUGA Involvement

Learn more about LGBTQ and allied student groups at the University of Georgia. 


Lambda Alliance

The mission of Lambda Alliance as a student organization is to support the student LGBTQA community at The University of Georgia through education, outreach, advocacy, inclusivity, community, and racial justice work.

  • Connections 
  • Programs
    • Lambda Alliance hosts a range of social and educational programs throughout the year including a welcome back event, drag shows, and LGBTQ prom.
  • Volunteer Opportunities
  • Caucuses 
    • Lambda Alliance has a number of caucuses, group space for individuals who share similar identities.
      • GenderClear (Transgender, Genderqueer, Non-Binary, and Gender Non-Conforming Individuals)
      • A-Spec (Asexual and Aromantic Identities)
      • Women Who Love Women
      • Men Who Love Men 
      • Multisexual (Multisexual Identities)

For more information visit Lambda Alliance.


LGBT Resource Center Ambassadors 

The LGBT Resource Center Ambassadors are students who participate in a one-year leadership program centered on equity, justice, and social change. Through this program the LGBTRC Ambassadors develop social and educational programs, serve as peer mentors on campus, and participate in outreach in the campus and Athens community. Students with more than 30 credit hours and/or who are second year UGA students may apply to be a member of the LGBT Resource Center Ambassador. 

  • Programs
    • LGBTRC Ambassadors plan educational and social events such as Sugar Rush (a sweet social in September), Fam(ily) Gathering (a community gathering and dinner in November), and LGBT History Month. 
  • Services 
    • As returning students, LGBT Resource Center Ambassadors are able to chat with new students about the campus and Athens LGBTQ communities, how to adjust to UGA, or simple things like where to find the best food. 

For more information visit LGBT Resource Center Ambassadors


PRISM 

PRISM is a dialogue group for students who identify as LGBTQ people of color. It was developed by the LGBT Resource Center and the Office of Multicultural Services and Programs (MSP) to recognize and address intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity. PRISM is held bi-weekly during the fall and spring semesters. 

For more information visit PRISM


Queeries 

Queeries is student-lead, multi-platform media content group created to open dialogue about the LGBTQ community within the UGA campus. Queeries content is intended to create conversation and space for all including LGBT individuals and allies.

For more information visit Queeries


Graduate Pride 

Graduate Pride is a group for graduate and professional students of The University of Georgia who identify as LGBTQ to build community. The mission of Graduate Pride shall be to build community for, advocate for, and provide support to the LGBT graduate and professional students at the University of Georgia.

  • Connections: 
    • Facebook 

For more information visit Graduate Pride

Safe Space Listserv Signup

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Student Leaders

Students are welcome to become involved with The LGBT Resource Center through our number of programs as well as by utilizing our services and resources.

Safe Space is a great program offered to faculty and staff. Our peer-led Safe Space session is a training program for students who are interested in learning about gender and sexual identity, homophobia, heterosexism, and how they can provide support and work toward being an ally for the LGBT community. Safe Space allows students to learn about LGBT student life at the university.  

Additionally, we offer programming throughout the year including Weeks of Welcome, Transgender Awareness Week, The Connect Conference, Lunch with Leaders, and Dawgs Making It Better. These programs allow students opportunities to engage with or collaborate with The LGBT Resource Center. 

If you are seeking information related to support and inclusive practices for students in classrooms, organizations, or within the context of higher education please visit our resource pages. There are several local and national resources available to you; student leaders and staff of The LGBT Resource Center also serve as resources and are able available for consultation, if needed.

Lastly, LGBT Resource Center staff and student leaders are available to provide presentations and speak during a number of engagements. In the past, student leaders of The LGBT Resource Center have provided presentations within residence halls, classrooms, departmental meetings, and organization meetings. 

For more information about programs, services, and resources offered by The LGBT Resource Center, please contact us lgbtrc@uga.edu, sign up to receive information through our weekly newsletter, or visit our center.

 

Connection with The Center

Hours of Operation 

Monday - Friday, 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

 

Facebook: Facebook.com/lgbtrcatuga

Twitter: @lgbtrcatuga

Instagram: @lgbtrcatuga

Email: lgbtrc@uga.edu

Presentation/Speaking Request Form

Interested in having staff and/or student leaders of The LGBT Resource Center participate in a presentation or speaking request? Complete this form to help us learn more about you and your goals.

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

Safe Space Requests

Groups of 10 or more individuals may submit a request for Safe Space session to be held for their group. For best results, please make requests at least 10 working days in advance of the intended date so that we can customize your session. Additionally, requests may be made for evening and weekend sessions pending Safe Space Facilitator availablity.

Volunteer Application

Interested in serving as a volunteer with The LGBT Resource Center? Apply now.

Faculty Mentors

Faculty Mentors are faculty members of the University of Georgia who serve as a link between their office/departments, The LGBT Resource Center, and academia. When called upon, Faculty Mentors help identify LGBT specific resources for students, staff, and faculty within higher education. 

For more information about current Faculty Mentors or to learn about how to become involved in the program, please contact Rashad Small, Senior Coordinator of The LGBT Resource Center.

Current Faculty Mentors

Weeks of Welcome

Join staff and student leaders of The LGBT Resource Center for a series of events intended to welcome students, staff, and faculty to back to The University of Georgia. 


Open House | August 15, 2018 | Memorial Hall Ballroom | 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM 

Join staff of The LGBT Resource Center for our annual Open House event. During the event you will have a chance to meet staff and student leaders of The LGBT Resource Center to learn about all things they've planned for the 2018-2019 year as well as learn more about services and resources for LGBT and allied students.

In addition, several campus, Athens, and Atlanta groups will be present at a resource fair for you to learn more about campus and community engagement.


Lambda Alliance Cookout | August 20, 2018 | Reed Hall Quad | 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Meet other students at the first Lambda Alliance event of the year, The Cookout. 


Lambda Alliance Meeting | August 27, 2018 | Tate Student Center Room 137 | 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Meet other students for the first Lambda Alliance meeting of the year to learn more about membership and how you can stay engaged with LGBT student life at UGA.  


PRISM Social| August 28, 2018 | The Intersection, Tate Student Center | 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM 

Prism is a dialogue group for students who identify as LGBT people of color. It was developed by the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center and the Office of Multicultural Services and Programs (MSP) to recognize and address intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity. Prism serves as a space to explore what it means to hold these identities, create dialogue, and build community in an informal and affirming setting.

Hosted by The LGBT Resource Center and Office of Multicultural Services and Programs 


Sugar Rush | September 12, 2018 | LGBT Resource Center | 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM 

People like sweet treats and conversation, right? Join The LGBT Resource Center Ambassadors for both at Sugar Rush. 

Faculty & Staff Resources

Faculty and staff are welcome to become involved with students through The LGBT Resource Center through our number of programs as well as by utilizing our services and resources.

Safe Space is a great program offered to faculty and staff. Safe Space is a training program for faculty, staff, and students who are interested in learning about gender and sexual identity, homophobia, heterosexism, and how they can provide support and work toward being an ally for the LGBT community. Safe Space allows new faculty/staff members to learn about LGBT student life at the university and allows returning faculty/staff to revisit old and new concepts.  

In addition to Safe Space, we offer programming throughout the year including Transgender Awareness Week, The Connect Conference, Lunch with Leaders, and Dawgs Making It Better. Many of these programs allow faculty and staff opportunities to collaborate with The LGBT Resource Center or provide presentations to the campus community.

If you are seeking information related to support and inclusive practices for students in classrooms, organizations, or within the context of higher education please visit our resource pages. There are several local and national resources available to you; staff of The LGBT Resource Center also serve as resources and are able available for consultation, if needed.

Lastly, LGBT Resource Center staff and student leaders are available to provide presentations and speak during a number of engagements. In the past, staff and student leaders have provided presentations within residence halls, classrooms, departmental meetings, and organization meetings. 

For more information about programs, services, and resources offered by The LGBT Resource Center, please contact us lgbtrc@uga.edu, sign up to receive information through our weekly newsletter, or visit our center.

 

Connection with The Center

Hours of Operation 

Monday - Friday, 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

 

Facebook: Facebook.com/lgbtrcatuga

Twitter: @lgbtrcatuga

Instagram: @lgbtrcatuga

Email: lgbtrc@uga.edu

Presentation/Speaking Request Form

Interested in having staff and/or student leaders of The LGBT Resource Center participate in a presentation or speaking request? Complete this form to help us learn more about you and your goals.

Suggested Learning Opportunities

View a list of suggested learning opportunities for students in your courses and student groups.

Safe Space

Learn more about Safe Space, a training for faculty, staff, and students who are interested in learning about how they can provide support for and work toward being an ally for the LGBT community.

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

GLOBES

GLOBES is a diverse organization of faculty, staff, and administrators whose mission is to advocate for, develop, and nurture UGA’s LGBT communities.

Resources for Prospective & Incoming Students

The University of Georgia has a number of offices and departments here to support you as you transition into the university. Take a moment to learn more about a few of the offices and departments most asked about by prospective and incoming students. 

 

Undergraduate Admissions

Did you know that The University of Georgia is the nation's first state-chartered institution and was founded in 1785? The university has a rich history and has a number of great opportunties for students. Learn more about the admissions process at The University of Georgia, more about the campus community, schedule a visit, and more by visiting their website. 

 

New Student Orientation

New Student Orientation at the University of Georgia seeks to prepare students for academic and social engagement as members of the UGA community. Through our transition programs and resources, we aim to provide information and experiences that will support students and their family in their transition to college and to the University of Georgia. Learn more about orientation and your Orientation Leaders by visiting the website. 

 

Office of Student Financial Aid

The staff of The Office of Student Financial Aid is available to advise prospective and current students of their eligibility for financial assistance, the resources and services available to them to secure funds for financing their education, and about the financial and academic responsibilities associated with the receipt of that aid.

 

University Health Center

The University Health Center exists to advance the well-being of students and other members of the University community and supports student success and resilience by providing primary and specialty health care, education and prevention focused services, and research which contributes to health knowledge and skills. Learn more about the services offered by visiting thier website. 

If you have questions about The University Health Center, contact staff of The LGBT Resource Center or our LGBT Liaison in University Health Center, Katy Janousek.

 

University Housing

More than 7,600 students reside in the university's 22 single-student residence halls with an additional 750 individuals and their families residing in our 20 family and graduate student apartment buildings and Health Sciences Campus townhomes. The work done in University Housing directly connects to the mission of the Division of Student Affairs and University of Georgia, that is, helping students learn. To learn more about University Housing or to plan a residence hall tour for yourself, visit their website.

If you have questions about University Housing, contact staff of The LGBT Resource Center or our LGBT Liaison in University Housing, Kim Ellis

 

Dining Services

The university has a number of great meal plan options for students in our residential and retail locations. Learn more about the options available to you by visiting their website. 

 

Center for Student Organizations & Involvement

In addition to the wide range of programs and activities here at UGA, the Center for Student Activies and Involvement registers more than 800 Student Organizations annually. These organizations cover a broad range of interests that include: Sport clubs, international and multicultural organizations, religious organizations, academic honorary organizations, and special interest clubs. Learn more through thier website. 

Prospective & Incoming Students

Message from The LGBT Resource Center Staff

Hello prospective and incoming students,

Welcome officially to The University of Georgia. Staff and student leaders are committed to providing community, support, and developmental resources for LGBT students and allies at the university. We will support and affirm every student inclusive of sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, and expression.

Our office is located in Memorial Hall in room 221 and we are open weekdays 8 AM - 5 PM.Our space includes a reception areas with a library of over 1000 books, current magazines, films and other resources; a student lounge equipped with a television, computers, printers, and lounge seating; and a quiet study with tables and computers. Through these spaces we aim to create an environment of advocacy, education, and support.

In addition to having a great space to operate in, we provided a variety of programs and services to increase awareness and foster understanding of issues related to sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression. Some of The Center’s signature programs include: Lunch with Leaders, The Connect Conference,  Dawgs Making It Better, Transgender Awareness Week, and Lavender Graduation.

The staff of the LGBT Resource Center is deeply committed to ensuring that all students, inclusive of their sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression, have a place where they can feel, express, and be their true, authentic self while attending the University of Georgia. Come in , send us an email, follow us on social media and say hello.

 

Connection with The Center

Facebook: Facebook.com/lgbtrcatuga

Twitter: @lgbtrcatuga

Instagram: @lgbtrcatuga

Email: lgbtrc@uga.edu

#LGBTQUGA Involvement

Learn more about LGBTQA student groups of UGA.

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions answered by student and staff of The LGBT Resource Center.

Resources For Prospective & Incoming Students

LGBT Friendly Activities in Athens

"A List By Students for Students"

Current Student & Alumni Perspectives

Student Volunteer Opportunities

With the support and involvement of student volunteers, The LGBT Resource Center continues to serve all students on The University of Georgia campus. Volunteers assist The LGBT Resource Center staff with establishing and maintaining an inclusive, welcoming environment for students, staff, and faculty of UGA.

Volunteers also assist The LGBT Resource Center staff with program development, special projects, and other initiatives. 

Previous Volunteer Projects

  • Lavender Graduation Program Development 
  • Asexuality Informational Brochure 
  • Graphic Design Materials
  • Large Scale Program Development & Assistance

Position Description

Volunteer Application

Interested in serving as a volunteer with The LGBT Resource Center? Apply now.

Transgender Awareness Week

History

Transgender Awareness Week is held as an extension of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation’s (GLAAD) Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). TDOR was first coordinated in 1998 as a vigil to commemorate transgender individuals lost to violence during that year; since the first TDOR, several vigils have been hosted on university and college campuses.  

The LGBTRC’s Transgender Awareness Week is weeklong series of 3 programs for the campus community, primarily undergraduate students, which will be offered in sequential order for enhanced learning and development. The events include a transgender allyship training session, a keynote presentation, as well as a remembrance memorial service and celebration. TAW is connected to the LGBTRC’s mission to create inclusive, sustainable spaces of self-discovery for the LGBT community within the University of Georgia as well as the Division of Student Life’s commitments to inclusion, application of knowledge, and supporting self-identity.

 

November 12 - 16, 2018 

Look for more information soon.

Facilities

Student Lounge (Room 220)

The LGBT Resource Center contains a student lounge equipped with 3 computers, a printer, and couches. The lounge is open Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM and is open to students to relax before, between, and after classes. 


Quiet Study (Room 218)

The quiet study is a room avaiable for students to enjoy a calm, quiet space betwen classes. This space includes 2 computers and a table with space for 4 individuals. This space is open Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM and reservable if the space is needed after hours or during the weekend. The quiet study is also designated as of the many lactation rooms across campus.


Tribal Lounge

As a shared space, the Tribal Lounge is a great location for student organization events, study groups, or just a place to hang out between classes. The Tribal Lounge can be reserved through the Office of International Student Life. Also available in this space is a comprehensive sound system that includes bluetooth technology, wireless microphone capabilities, etc.


Conference Room (Room 210E)

The conference room is available for groups that desire a more formal meeting space. This space includes a computer with flat‐screen TV display and a conference table that can seat up to 10 people. The conference room can be reserved through the Office of International Student Life.


The Intersection (Tate Student Union)

The Intersection is a new and dynamic space on campus, offering a platform for UGA students, staff, and faculty to explore issues of social justice.

Quiet Study

Please fill out the form below to submit a reservation request for the quiet study.

Conference Room/Tribal Lounge

Please fill out the form below to submit a reservation request for the conference room/Tribal Lounge.

The Intersection

Follow this link to learn more about The Intersection, events hosted within the space, and how to reserve it.

Graduate Pride

Graduate Pride is a group for graduate and professional students of The University of Georgia who identify as LGBT to build community. The mission of Graduate Pride shall be to build community for, advocate for, and provide support to the LGBT graduate and professional students at the University of Georgia.

The student leaders of Graduate Pride coordinate events and meetings for their members including:

  • Social Events at Local Restaurants and Businesses
  • Group Study Sessions
  • Informational Sessions

Spring 2018 Events

 

LGBTQ Graduate, Faculty, and Staff Welcome 

Meet graduate and professional students for this welcome event to network, build community, and learn about the resources available to LGBTQ students.

Hosted by Graduate Pride of the LGBT Resource Center.

August 31, 2018 

Tate Student Center Room 473 

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM 

 


Contact Information

​lgbtrc@uga.edu

Facebook 

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

Lambda Alliance

 

Lambda Alliance, first established in 1971 as the Committee on Gay Education (CGE), came into being in order to meet the needs of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students. After a temporary hiatus of LGBT student groups after CGE disbanded in 1983, Athens Gay and Lesbian Association (AGLA) formed to meet community needs within 1990; AGLA later became the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Student Union in 1992. Lambda Alliance officially came into being as an official student organization in 1998 and within 2005 was renamed Lambda Alliance: UGA's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Allied Student Organization. 

Mission Statement

The mission of Lambda Alliance as a student organization is to support the student LGBTQA community at The University of Georgia through education, outreach, advocacy, inclusivity, community, and racial justice work. Lambda Alliance strives to: 

  • Create a safe, secure, and supportive environment for the LGBTQA community by increasing social awareness of LGBTQA presence and concerns
  • Promote acts of public service
  • Monitor political issues relevant to the LGBTQA community and strive to create political change to serve the LGBTQA community
  • Provide outlets for social interaction among Lambda Alliance members and the LGBTQA community

 

Lambda Alliance Welcome Cookout

Monday, August 22

5:00 PM - 8:00 PM 

Location: TBD


Fall 2018 Meeting Times 

Meetings are held every other Monday at 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM in Tate Student Center Room 137. 

August 27 

September 10 & 24

October 8 & 22 

November 26

December 3


Contact Information 

If you have any questions, concerns, or want to talk to someone, feel free to send an email to Lambda Alliance.

Lambda Alliance
University of Georgia
222 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

uga.lambda@gmail.com

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Lambda Alliance Constitution

Learn more about Lambda Alliance and governance.

Caucus Information

Learn more about Lambda Alliance's caucus spaces. Caucuses are spaces for folks of similar identities to connect, socialize, and learn together.

Lambda Alliance Caucus Leader Application

Apply to be a Caucus Group Leader.

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

2018 - 2019 Safe Space Facilitators

Amanda Torrence (She/Her/Hers)


Anneliese Singh (She/Her/Hers & They/Them/Thiers)


Cat Ashe (She/Her/Hers)


CB Snowden (She/Her/Hers)

Chalis "CB" Snowden is a graduate student within The University of Georgia. She is a returning Safe Space facilitator and she is honored and excited to be invovled in the program. In addtion to her involvement with the LGBT Resource Center, Chalis is a member of GLOBES, UGA's LGBTQ faculty and staff organization. 


CJ Komp (He/Him/His)


Eric Siy (He/Him/His)

Eric Siy is a graduate student in the Department of Mathematics and Science Education and is currently pursuing a PhD in Mathematics Education. As a southern California native, Eric has lived in highly diverse areas and sees the value in developing an equity lens, especially in the field of education. Prior to moving to Georgia, he taught math in the Philippines and in Queens, NY. These experiences developed a research and pedagogical interest in the developing of equitable instruction in mathematics teacher education. He has been a Safe Space facilitator since 2014. When he was teaching, Eric used to do stand-up comedy to balance his day out. He is currently withholding a joke to end his facilitator blurb.


Jaci Hawkins (She/Her/Hers)


Jake Mosley (He/Him/His)  

Jake Mosley is currently the Director of Student Services for the Full-Time MBA program in the Terry College of Business. Originally from Lyons, GA, Jake moved to Athens to attend UGA where he earned an A.B. in History and an A.B in Political Science. He is pursuing an MEd in Educational Administration and Policy. Jake enjoys spending time with his family helping his wife April raise their daughter Chloe Jo and their cat Olive.


Joy Strickland (She/Her/Hers)


Katy Janousek (She/Her/Hers)

Katy Janousek has served as the Sexual Health Coordinator at the University of Georgia Health Center since 2008. She received a BS in Psychology from Virginia Tech and a MS in Public Health Education from James Madison University. She is nationally credentialed as a Certified Health Education Specialist. In her role on campus she provides group presentations, classroom lectures, educational counseling, and advises peer educators. She is also a LGBT Resource Center Liaison for the University Health Center. Katy has co-facilitated Safe Space trainings since 2009 and is the 2015 recipient of the LGBT Resource Center’s Founder’s Award.


Logan Herren (She/Her/Hers) 

Logan Herren is the administrative associate for the Department of Kinesiology. She earned her BA in English Literature with a minor in Photography from Georgia College and State University, and hopes to enter into a master's program for Social Work and fulfill her dream of leading a queer youth safe-house here in Georgia. She originally comes from the mountains of north Georgia, and loves good talks, carbs, and her pup, Lily. She's very excited about being a Safe Space facilitator, and invites anyone to drop by her office for "words of the week" and maybe even a post-it doodle.


Melvin Whitehead (He/Him/His)


Dr. Sandrine Bosshardt (She/Her/Hers)

Dr. Sandrine Bosshardt is a licensed psychologist and joined the CAPS staff in the summer of 2012. Born and raised in The Netherlands, she moved to Knoxville, Tennessee in 1996 to pursue a PhD in Psychology. She has worked in several different areas in Student Affairs at different universities, but she feels most at home working in UGA’s counseling center and feels honored to work with such a diversity of students. Dr. Bosshardt's areas of interest include developmental/identity issues, LGBTQQIAA+, interpersonal/relationship concerns, training and supervision, and social justice. At CAPS she often works with college students who identify as LGBTQQIAA+, and she is able to provide supporting documentation for trans and gender non-conforming students. When she is not working she loves to listen to and play music, travel, and dream of one day owning an animal sanctuary.


Dr. Shannon Bowles (She/Her/Hers) 

Dr. Shannon M. Bowles joined the Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) clinical staff in October, 2010. She holds a BA in Sociology from the University of Virginia and an MEd in Counselor Education with an emphasis in student affairs practice in higher education also from the University of Virginia. She earned her PhD in Counseling Psychology at West Virginia University. Dr. Bowles completed her pre-doctoral internship at Appalachian State University's Counseling & Psychological Services Center and her post-doctoral fellowship at Georgia State University's Counseling & Testing Center. Her areas of interest include student affairs administration, psychotherapy for family of origin concerns, and alcohol and other drug assessment, treatment, and recovery in the college student population. Dr. Bowles serves as the CAPS Outreach Coordinator and as the liaison between CAPS and the LGBT Resource Center. At CAPS she has an emphasis in working with college students who identify as LGBTQQIAA+, including providing supporting documentation for trans* and gender non-conforming students. She uses she/her/hers pronouns.


Tiffany R. Smith (She/Her/Hers)

LGBTRC Liaisons

Liaisons are staff and faculty of the University of Georgia who serve as a link between their office/department and The LGBT Resource Center. When called upon, liaisons help identify LGBT specific resources for students, staff, and faculty within their office/department. 

For more information about current liaisons or to learn about how to become a liaison, please contact Rashad Small, Senior Coordinator of The LGBT Resource Center.

LGBTRC Liaisons

LGBT Alumni Contact Form

Are you an UGA alum?

The LGBT Resource Center is excited to invite you to be a part of our UGA LGBT Alumni Community! In an effort to develop and strengthen connections with our alumni, we are launching a Coming Home Campaign. The campaign will be a series of efforts designed to reach out and reconnect with our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, asexual, queer, and ally UGA alumni and we hope that you will join us in creating this community. First and foremost, please provide us with some basic contact information by completing the Alumni Contact form to the right. Please be sure to do this in order to continue receiving information about upcoming alumni events. Our next correspondence will be to share details of an upcoming social gathering that is in the works, so be sure to keep an eye out for that information! We look forward to connecting with you!

Go Dawgs!

 

 

Transgender Resources

LGBT Cookout on Reed Quad

Transgender Resources

Housing
The Director of the LGBT Resource Center works directly with the Department of University Housing
to review all requests for accommodations. Students desiring to make a request for accommodations
or who are open to having a transgender roommate should contact the LGBT Resource Center.

Students should follow the guidelines established for registering for housing and/or participating in
Returning Resident Room Sign-Up as advertised by University Housing. New incoming students can
find more detailed information about the assignments process by visiting the University Housing website.

Health & Wellness
The University of Georgia Health Center advances the health of students, spouses and domestic partners
by providing: primary health care, prevention focused services, and learning experiences which develop
health knowledge and skills. As it is committed to meeting the needs of the University's transgender
community, there are services that students should be aware of at the Health Center.

Clinicians
The Health Center supports students in the coordination of their total health care needs. Clinicians are
available to provide resources for on-campus and off-campus care including medical care, counseling and psychotherapy, hormonal therapy, health education, and other local specialists. You can make an
appointment online with your Primary Care Provider (PCP) at Medical Services or by calling 706-542-1162 or 706-542-8666.

Hormonal Therapy
The Health Center can administer prescribed hormones in several ways. Clinicians can administer
hormonal therapies ordered through the Health Center's pharmacy or brought by students from their
coordinating physician/pharmacy.

Gynecological Exams
Gynecological exams are an important part of your total health care. To ensure a safe and comfortable
exam, the Health Center offers these exams both in the Women's Clinic and in other Primary Care Clinics
as needed. Individuals who identify as FTM who prefer not to be seen in the Women's Clinic may set up
an appointment for the exam in a different clinic after consultation with their own PCP.

Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS)
Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) in the University Health Center provides short-term counseling and psychiatric services for students. For specific information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students, check out their website here.

Crisis services are also available for emergencies. During regular hours, you may contact CAPS at 706-542-2273 and speak with the walk-in clinician or come to CAPS for a walk-in appointment. For after-hours emergencies, the emergency on-call clinician may be reached by calling the UGA Police at 706-542-2200.

Health Promotion
The staff of the Health Promotion Department is committed to educating students about the impact of their choices on their health, and on the community, and to promoting community norms that support health enhancing behaviors. Topic areas include: nutrition, alcohol and other drugs, stress, tobacco cessation, sexual health, and violence prevention. University Health Center offers sexual health information that is specifically attentive to LGBTQA needs. The sexual health coordinator, Katy Janousek is happy to answer anonymous phone calls, emails, or schedule appointments to sit down and chat in her office.

Official Name Changes
The Office of the Registrar works with students to make official name changes and sex designation
changes for students. Contact the Registrar at 706.542.6902 to set up a time to discuss your individual
needs.

Gender Neutral Restrooms
The LGBT Resource Center,Lambda Alliance, and many student volunteers have compiled a list of gender neutral and/or single stall restroom facilities on-campus. If you know of any other gender neutral restroom facilities on-campus, please email lgbtrc@uga.edu to add it to the list. 

If you are visiting the LGBT Resource Center, there are two gender neutral/single stall restrooms located on the second floor of Memorial Hall.

LGBT National Resources

Two students at LGBT cookout

National Resources

Affordable Colleges Online
Information on resources, curricula, and student organizations is provided, as well as candid interviews with LGBTQ community leaders to help alleviate some of the worries that LGBTQ students may have when it comes to postsecondary education.

Campus Pride
Campus Pride is a national online community and resource network committed to student leaders and campus organizations who work to create a safer campus environment free of homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, heterosexism, and genderism at colleges and universities. Campus Pride also has a free downloadable Lil’ Purple Backpack Resource Guide with lots of tips and strategies for student organizing and social justice tips.

Lambda10 Project
The Lambda10 Project - National Clearinghouse for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Fraternity &
Sorority Issues works to heighten the visibility of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members of
the college fraternity by serving as a clearinghouse for educational resources and educational materials
related to sexual orientation and gender identity/expression as it pertains to the fraternity/sorority
experience.

The Trevor Project
The Trevor Project is a nonprofit endeavor established to promote acceptance of gay and questioning
teenagers, and to aid in suicide prevention among that group. The Trevor Helpline is the only national toll-
free, 24-hour, 365 day-a-year confidential suicide hotline for gay and questioning teens.

Transgender Law and Policy Institute
advocacy for transgender people in our society. The TLPI brings experts and advocates together to work
on law and policy initiatives designed to advance transgender equality. On this site you can find a host of
resources including hate crimes laws, current legislation, and college/school policies.

The National Center for Transgender Equality 
The National Center for Transgender Equality is a national social justice organization devoted to ending
discrimination and violence against transgender people through education and advocacy on national
issues of importance to transgender people. By empowering transgender people and allies to educate
and influence policymakers and others, NCTE facilitates a strong and clear voice for transgender equality
in our nation's capital and around the country.

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force 
Founded in 1973, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Foundation was the first national lesbian,
gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights and advocacy organization and remains the
movement's leading voice for freedom, justice, and equality. It works to build the grassroots political
strength of the LGBT community by training state and local activists and leaders, working to strengthen
the infrastructure of state and local allies, and organizing broad-based campaigns to build public support
for complete equality for LGBT people.

Lambda Legal 
Lambda Legal is a national organization committed to achieving full recognition of the civil rights of
lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender people and those with HIV through impact litigation, education,
and public policy work.

The Asexual Visibility & Education Network
AVEN hosts the world's largest online asexual community as well as a large archive of resources on asexuality. AVEN strives to create open, honest discussion about asexuality among sexual and asexual people alike.

BiNet USA 
A 501(c)(3) non-profit advocating for bisexual communities in the U.S.

The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) 
The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation is dedicated to promoting and ensuring fair, accurate and inclusive representation of people and events in the media as a means of eliminating homophobia and discrimination based on gender identity.

National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC)
The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) is a civil rights organization dedicated to empowering Black lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. NBJC’s mission is to end racism and homophobia.

Intersex Society of North America
The Intersex Society of North America (ISNA) was founded in 1993 in an effort to advocate for patients
and families who felt they had been harmed by their experiences with the health care system. From these
scrappy, brave, and confrontational beginnings, ISNA evolved into an important resource for clinicians,
parents, and affected individuals who require basic information about disorders of sex development
(DSDs) and for how to improve the health care and overall well-being of people with DSDs.

LGBT Local Resources

Love is Love is Love T-shirt

Local Resources

Athens/Clarke County Unified Government
The Athens/Clarke County Commission voted in 2006 to include sexual orientation and gender identity & expression in its nondicrimination policy. In addition, the Commission voted to offer domestic partner benefits for all county employees. They also offer a domestic partner registry for Athens/Clarke County residents and employees.

Our Hope Metropolitan Community Church
Our Hope Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) is a commissioned church of Metropolitan Community Church. Like all MCC churches around the world, Our Hope plays a vital role in addressing the spiritual needs of all people, but especially the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and "straight-but-not-narrow" community.

AIDS Athens
AIDS Athens was founded by a group of Athens residents who attended a forum on AIDS at the University of Georgia in February 1987. The group initiated AIDS Athens later that year, and received nonprofit 501c (3) status two years later. In October 1995, members of AIDS Athens approved changes in the structure of the organization and renamed it the AIDS Coalition of Northeast Georgia, as the organization grew to serve clients living in 10 Northeast Georgia counties. In August 2004, the AIDS Coalition was renamed AIDS Athens to emphasize the reaffirmation of its mission to serve all local people infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.

Boybutante AIDS Foundation
Since its birth in 1989, the Boybutante Ball–along with its sponsors and the people who attend its events–has raised more than half a million dollars for AIDS services organizations. With tremendous community support, the Boybutante Ball is now preceded by a week of special events at various venues in downtown Athens, and followed by a delicious brunch. The Boybutante AIDS Foundation also raises money throughout the year by hosting Boybutante Bingo – Christmas in July, a Back to School Party, our annual Boo-Butante Halloween Party, and other special events. We also proudly sponsor fundraising events of other organizations involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Athens Pride
Athens PRIDE is a collaborative effort of many non-profit efforts to celebrate the diversity of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer community of Athens, GA.

Metro Atlanta Association of Professionals
MAAP’s mission is to create an inclusive environment for the Metro Atlanta LGBTA+ community that allows for professional development through networking, high-quality events, training, mentoring and education.

Atlanta Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce
Atlanta Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce was formed in 1995 to lead the way in development, advocacy and growth for the GLBT community and its allies. It accomplishes this through networking, education and personal development for both businesses and working professionals.

Institute for Welcoming Resources (IWR) 
IWR's mission is to create resources that support the unconditional welcome of people of all sexual orientations and gender identities and their families in the [Christian] church home of their choice. Resources include materials on a variety of LGBT issues and a “welcoming congregation” finder to assist in locating an LGBTQ-welcoming place of Christian worship.

HRC Atlanta
As the largest civil rights organization working to achieve equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans, the Human Rights Campaign represents a force of more than 1.5 million members and supporters nationwide — all committed to making HRC's vision a reality.

Georgia Equality
Georgia Equality’s mission is to advance fairness, safety and opportunity for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities and our allies throughout the state.

YouthPride Atlanta
YouthPride provides a safe, comfortable space where youth can conduct support and discussion groups, plan youth-led workshops, utilize library and computer resources, attend social gatherings, or explore educational and career opportunities. YouthPride remains metro Atlanta's only LGBTQQ organization dedicated solely to the needs and interests of youth.

GAVoice
GA Voice is the media outlet of record for the LGBT community in Atlanta and throughout the state. Bi-weekly print edition and a 24/7 updated website. Website offers events calendars, links to health, service, and other organizations, as well as information about news and culture.

The Health Initiative
The Health Initiative provides education, advocacy, support and improved access to care to Georgia’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) community. Founded in 1996, we are the largest non-profit organization in the southeast devoted solely to the health and wellness of LGBTQ people. Resources include a Healthcare Provider database, a Health Fund to ensure care for under- and uninsured individuals, the Phillip Rush Center meeting and community event space, and other wellness programs.

Feminist Women’s Health Center
Since 1977, the Feminist Women's Health Center (FWHC) has strived to empower women through service, education, and advocacy. Our center embraces a holistic approach to health care and wellness. We believe that education and knowledge are vital components in a woman's ability to make positive health care decisions. We actively include those who experience unique barriers to both education and healthcare access including non-English speakers, youth, GLBTQI*, all racial/ethnic/cultural communities and people with varied capabilities.

Library

LGBTRC Library

LGBTRC Library

Library

The LGBT Resource Center provides many resources for UGA students, faculty, and staff. These include books, videos, journals, magazines, and a variety of brochures.  Books may be checked out for two weeks and videos can be checked out for one week.

 

Click to search the LGBTRC Library

 

Hi All! Here are some quick and easy steps on how to use UGA’s new library database.

How to Register

1. Sign up for a lilbib account. This will only take a few minutes and once it’s done, you’ll never have to do it again. Start by visiting www.libib.com. Type in your first and last name, your desired username, your email address, and your password. (Note: This does not have to be your UGA email and password) Then click “Start My Library” at the bottom of the screen.

2. After you’ve logged in, click on the blue person icon located in the upper right hand corner of the screen to add friends.

3. Underneath where it says “Find Friends” type “LGBTUGA” into the text box.

4. Click the “Follow” button beneath the lgbtuga.libib.com link.

 

How to Place Holds on Books/Movies

                  If You Are Trying To Place A Hold For The First Time

1. You must send a completed Library Waiver Form (see link below) to register before you place any holds on books/movies. This may take 2-3 days to be processed and must be processed before you can place any holds. You cannot continue in the process until you have completed this step and staff at the LGBTRC have added you to the LGBTRC Library database. 

2. Log into your libib account (after you’ve selected LGBTUGA as a user to follow, see “How to Register” for instructions on how to follow us) and click on “Following” on the upper right-hand corner of the page.

3. Click on the lgbtuga.libib.com link.

4. If you want to find books, click on the “LGBTRC Library” button, and if you wish to look at our movie selection click the “LGBTRC Movies” button.

You can search for the book/movie selection you want either by
-Alphabetical order
-Tag List
-Directly Typing Title Into the Search Box

5. Once you have found book(s)/movie(s) you wish to check out, click on the lock icon beneath the book picture to place a hold on your desired item(s).  If you have a token (an assigned password which is different than your login password) already, type in your email and token.  If you do not already have a token, click on the “need token?” button.  Type in your email address and a token will be sent to you.

6. Once you have received a token, type in token and email address to place a hold on your items.

Congrats! Your item(s) are now on hold for you

 

                If You Are Not a First Time User

1. Log into your libib account (after you’ve selected LGBTUGA as a user to follow, see “How to Register” for instructions on how to follow us) and click on “Following” on the upper right-hand corner of the page.

2. Click on the lgbtuga.libib.com link.

3. If you want to find books, click on the “LGBTRC Library” button, and if you wish to look at our movie selection click the “LGBTRC Movies” button.

You can search for the book/movie selection you want either by
-Alphabetical order
-Tag List
-Directly Typing Title Into the Search Box

4. Once you have found book(s)/movie(s) you wish to check out, click on the lock icon beneath the book picture to place a hold on your desired item(s).  If you have a token (an assigned password which is different than your login password) already, type in your email and token.  If you do not already have a token, click on the “need token?” button.  Type in your email address and a token will be sent to you.

5. Once you have received token, type in token and email address to place a hold on your items.

Congrats! Your item(s) are now on hold for you

 

How to Receive Your Books/Movies

1. Come to the LGBT Resource Center. We are located in Memorial Hall room 221 and open 8am-5pm, M-F. Your books/movies will be waiting for you there.

LGBTRC Library

You can find a sample of the more than 1000 items currently available.

Library Waiver

Please complete this form if you are a first-time user of the LGBT Resource Center Library.

Career Center LGBT Resources

Career Center

The University of Georgia’s Career Center provides many resources for LGBTQ students including resources on coming out in the workplace, LGBTQ inclusive employers and more.  

Every student at The University of Georgia has a Career Consultant, assigned by academic area, (including undecided majors) who provides one-on-one assistance with career decision-making, resume and letter writing, job search strategies, etc. Many of the Career Consultants have been trained through UGA’s Safe Space program on LGBTQ issues.  

The LGBT Resource Center’s Career Center liaison is Kali DeWald.

Campus Resources

Campus Resources

Institute for Women's Studies
The University of Georgia Institute for Women's Studies provides a feminist interdisciplinary perspective
on women and gender. Administratively a program in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Women's
Studies cooperates with departments of all schools and colleges of the University in developing its
curriculum and programming.
 

Andrea Carson Coley Lecture
The Institute's programming includes the annual Andrea Carson Coley Lecture endowed by a donation
by Andrew and Kathy Coley in memory of their daughter Andrea Carson Coley (1972-1993), who was
a certificate candidate in Women's Studies. Each spring, our Andrea Carson Coley Lecture brings to
campus scholars doing cutting-edge research in the area of lesbian and gay studies.
 

Lambda Alliance
Lambda Alliance, first established in 1992 as the Athens Gay and Lesbian Association, came into being in order to meet the needs of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, asexual (LGBTQA), and allied students, faculty, and staff. We are now an officially recognized student organization at the University of Georgia, and our mission is to strengthen the LGBTQA community here on campus and in the larger Athens community.
 

GLOBES
GLOBES is a diverse organization of faculty, staff, graduate students and administrators, whose mission is to advocate for, develop, and nurture UGA’s LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) communities. Check out their Facebook here.
 

University Health Center
The University Health Center exists to advance the physical and mental health of students and other
eligible members of the University community in a way that supports academic success and student
retention by providing primary and specialty health care, prevention focused services, and learning
experiences which develop health knowledge and skills.
 

Health Promotion Department
The staff of the Health Promotion Department is committed to educating students about the impact of their choices on their health, and on the community, and to promoting community norms that support health enhancing behaviors. Topic areas include: nutrition, alcohol and other drugs, stress, tobacco cessation, sexual health, and violence prevention.

University Health Center offers sexual health information that is specifically attentive to LGBTQA needs. The sexual health coordinator, Katy Janousek is happy to answer anonymous phone calls, emails, or schedule appointments to sit down and chat in her office.
 

UGA Sexual Health Advocacy Group (SHAG) 
SHAG is a student run organization that aims to start conversation about sexual communication and sexual health by training advocates to facilitate peer-to-peer programming.

Annual campus-wide events SHAG helps out with include: Wrap That Halloweiner, World AIDS Day, Sexual Responsibility Week (which includes National Condom Day), Healthy Dawg Fest and Safe Spring Break.
 

Counseling and Psychiatric Services
Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) in the University Health Center provides short-term counseling and psychiatric services for students. For specific information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students, check out their website here. Crisis services are also available for emergencies. During regular hours, you may contact CAPS at 706-542-2273 and speak with the walk-in clinician or come to CAPS for a walk-in appointment. For after-hours emergencies, the emergency on-call clinician may be reached by calling the UGA Police at 706-542-2200.

LGBT Research

Students by computers

Research

The LGBT Resource Center supports the important research of campus partners and scholars. While the Center will not endorse, sponsor, or recruit participants for your study, we will include your announcement in our weekly update e-mail to the listserv, as well as hang a “Call for Participants” flier in the Center on a case-by-case basis. Research should be related to the mission of the LGBTRC and our commitments to issues of sexual orientation, gender, and related topics.

We also encourage researchers to post their information on our Facebook page.

LGBT Scholarships

Two students at Lavender Graduation

Scholarships

A number of scholarships are available for LGBT students across the country. Here is a list of local and national scholarships. Please note that some of the scholarships are for students attending specific institutions.

Audria M Edwards Youth Scholarship Fund (Oregon)

The Point Foundation: A Scholarship Lifeline for LGBT Students

University of Georgia Office of Financial Aid

Project Youth - Transgender Youth Scholarship 2018

College Guide for LGBT Students

Information about scholarships and strategies to help make the transition to college easier for LGBT students.

Queeries

Queeries

Queeries is student-lead media content group created to open dialogue about the LGBT community within the UGA campus. Queeries content is intended to create conversation and space for all including LGBT individuals and allies.

 


 

 

Fall 2018 Interest Meetings

If you're interested in being a part of Queeries through co-hosting a podcast or managing a social media presence, we'd love to see you! Attending doesn't mean committing, just come to hang out and learn more.

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM in the LGBT Resource Center

Tuesday September 25

Monday October 1

 

 

Contact Information 

ugaqueeries@gmail.com

Facebook

Twitter

 

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

PRISM

PRISM is a dialogue group for students who identify as LGBT people of color. It was developed by the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center and the Office of Multicultural Services and Programs (MSP) to recognize and address intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity. PRISM serves as a space to explore what it means to hold these identities, create dialogue, and build community in an informal and affirming setting.

Location: The Intersection (3rd Floor of Tate Student Union)

Day: Every other Tuesday

Time: 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM 


Fall 2018 Dates

  • August 28
  • September 4
  • September 18
  • October 9
  • October 16
  • October 30
  • November 13
  • November 27

For more information about PRISM contact Olivia Tran at oktran@uga.edu or Tiffany Smith at tiffanyrsmith@uga.edu.

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

Lunch With Leaders/Dinner Dialogues

The Lunch with Leaders and Dinner Dialogues program is an opportunity for students to have a meal and informal discussion with an out, LGBTQ-identified community leader who briefly shares their personal story, how they came to terms with their identity, how they have balanced their identity with other aspects of their life, and how their identity has affected their career path.

October 17, 2018

"Graduate Students and Navigating Academia"

Tate Student Center, Room 473 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM


Meet a group of current current LGBT graduate and professional students for conversations about applying to graduate school, life as LGBT students, and their future as young professionals. 

In addition, meet staff members from The Graduate School and Career Center for advice and recommendations.
 

 

 


Previous Speakers: 

  • Dr. Dawn D. Bennett-Alexander, UGA Associate Professor of Employment Law & Legal Studies
  • Joan Prittie, Executive Director of Project Safe
  • Annette Hatton, Former Managing Editor of the Georgia Review
  • Meg Evans, Director of the LGBT Resource Center 
  • Dr. Ken Jackson, Head Professional School Counselor (Decatur High School)
  • Joselyn Leimbach, Lecturer with the Institute for Women's Studies at UGA
  • Dr. Justin Lavner, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and an affiliate faculty member in the Institute for Women’s Studies at UGA. 
  • Dr. Kadesha Evans, Director of Nursing Advantage Behavioral Health Systems (Athens, GA) 
  • Dr. Anneliese A. Singh, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Diversity and Equity in the College of Education at UGA.

Connect Conference Presentation Proposals

Fill out my online form.

Connect Conference Registration Form

Fill out my online form.

Connect Conference

Connect Conference Flyer

2019 Connect Conference

March 2, 2019

Tate Student Center, Grand Hall

9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The Connect Conference is centered on the LGBT community, creating solidarity, and community-building. The conference is a one-day event on March 2, 2019, and will be free to UGA students, staff, and faculty. All other individuals will need to purchase tickets before the event online at $25 per ticket or on the day of the conference at $30. The LGBT Resource Center's staff is committed to providing access to all those who would like to attend the event; if you are unable to pay the registration fee, please contact the LGBT Resource Center staff at lgbtrc@uga.edu

Do you have a passion for a certain topic? Something you just can't stop talking about? Submit your session proposal for this year's conference!

 

LGBT Safe Space - August 23, 2016

Fill out the online form.

LGBT Safe Space - April 5, 2016

Fill out my online form.

LGBT Safe Space - March 25, 2016

Fill out my online form.

Safe Space

The Safe Space program at UGA is a three and a half hour training for faculty, staff, and students who are interested in learning about gender and sexual identity, homophobia, heterosexism, and how they can provide support and work toward being an ally for the LGBT community. Upon completion of the training, participants may be issued a Safe Space sticker for their office space as a visible indicator to visitors that they are LGBTQ affirming.


Become Safe Space Trained
Click on a date below to register for Safe Space Trainings.  All trainings, unless otherwise indicated, will be held in The Intersection (3rd Floor of Tate Student Center, across from Tate Print & Copy).

 

September 17 (1:00 PM - 4:30 PM)

September 30-Student Session (3:00 PM - 6:30 PM)

October 30 (8:30 AM - 12:00 PM) 

November 28 (8:30 AM - 12:00 PM) 

 

Safe Space trainings are offered throughout the academic year. The sessions are led by two trained facilitators. To ensure an engaging and developmental experience, each training is limited to 20 participants. Our trainings often fill up fast and may have a wait list so it is very important for you to contact us if for any reason your plans change and you can no longer make the date for which you are registered. Pre-registration is required for attendance.


Participate in the Certificate in Diversity & Inclusion (University Faculty & Staff)

The Certificate in Diversity and Inclusion (CDI) creates an opportunity for UGA faculty and staff to explore strategic areas around diversity and improve their ability to contribute to the enhancement of UGA’s welcoming and inclusive environment.

Enrollment in the courses listed for the Certificate for Diversity and Inclusion are open to all UGA faculty and staff. UGA employees may take courses in pursuit of the certificate or they may take individual courses based on their needs and interests.

Successful completion of the CDI requires completion of the core course and five elective courses in the program. A variety of courses will be offered each quarter and all of the courses in the program are free.

 

Certificate In Diversity & Inclusion Information

Safe Space Network

This list notes individuals who have participated in Safe Space training and are Safe Space certified. This document can be searched via the “Find” feature for specific departments and/or people.

Safe Space Requests

Groups of 10 or more individuals may submit a request for Safe Space session to be held for their group. For best results, please make requests at least 10 working days in advance of the intended date so that we can customize your session. Additionally, requests may be made for evening and weekend sessions pending Safe Space Facilitator availablity.

2018 - 2019 Safe Space Facilitators

Meet the faculty, staff, and graduate students who facilitate Safe Space training.

LGBT Ambassadors

Ambassador Logo

The Ambassador Program seeks to build a connection with students who want to represent the LGBTRC and cultivate their leadership capacities. This program provides students an opportunity to get more involved in center programming and initiatives; become better informed on LGBT and allied topics and concerns; and further develop their leadership skills. The three core principles framing the Ambassador program are social justice, advocacy, and leadership.

Ambassadors will spend the academic year learning and developing leadership skills connected to equity, justice, and social change. They will assist the LGBTRC by creating a safe space for the LGBT community, being a point of contact for new students and visitors, working to better foster fellowship and community, developing and designing outreach projects, and advising the LGBTRC staff on important issues and concerns.

Through the Ambassador Link initiative, the ambassadors are able to meet faculty, staff, and students to talk about a variety of issues or for consultations. If you need help learning more about affirming spaces, need a person to talk to about an experience, or need someone who can listen to you than the ambassadors are the people for you. Ambassadors can meet you in the LGBT Resource Center or somewhere you prefer.

Ambassador Position Description

Learn more about the responsibilities of the Ambassadors.

Ambassador Link

Connect with an Ambassador.

LGBT Resource Center ListServs

Join one or more of the six LGBT ListServ groups to receive regular updates on events, resources, and more. Newsletters are sent to the ListServ members on weekly and/or monthly cycles.

Founder's Award Nomination Form

Fill out my online form.

For more information about Lavender Graduation, contact us at lgbtrc@uga.edu.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Founder's Award

Four graduates at Lavender Graduation

The Founder's Award was established in 2005 and given at the first Lavender Graduation, sponsored by the LGBT Resource Center, Lambda Alliance, and GLOBES. This award honors an individual who has made a significant and lasting contribution to the University of Georgia LGBTQ community. The winner of this award is recognized each year at our annual Lavender Graduation.

The award was established in honor of its first recipient, Asa Green whose story and contribution to the community inspired the creation of the award. Asa Green co-founded the first LGBT student organization at UGA, the Committee on Gay Education (CGE), in 1971. This group held several events on campus, including a dance in the Memorial Hall Ballroom. CGE took the University to court for the right to use the ballroom for the dance. This dance, in 1972, was the first gay dance at a university in the Southeast.

Any staff, faculty, or community member who has made a substantial and long-lasting contribution to the LGBTQ community at the University of Georgia is eligible for nomination.

The criteria upon which the nominees are evaluated are:

• Connection to the LGBTQ community
• Significant contribution(s) to the LGBTQ community at UGA
• Lasting impact of contribution(s)
• Leadership in the LGBTQ community


Past Founder’s Award Recipients

2018: The College of Education Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

2017:  Disability Resource Center of University of Georgia 

2016: Deidre Kane, Director of Admissions, Terry College of Business

2015: Katy Janousek, Sexual Health Coordinator at The University of Georgia’s Health Center

2014: Ms. Ricky Roberts, Board Member of Athens Pride and Georgia Equality

2013: Olivia Long, Executive Director of AIDS Athens

2012: Dr. Needham Yancey Gulley, Chairperson for Boybutante AIDS Foundation, community activist

2011: Dr. Corey Johnson, Co-Founder of Georgia Safe Schools Coalition 

2009: Reverend Dr. Renee DuBose, Past of Our Hope Metropolitan community Church 

2008: Dr. Michael Shutt, First Director of The University of Georgia LGBT Resource Center

2007: Dr. Rodney Bennett, Vice President of Student Affairs at The University of Georgia 

2006: Annette Hatton, Founder of GLOBES, the queer faculty/staff organization at The University of Georgia

2005: Asa Green, Co-Founder of the Committee on Gay Education at The University of Georgia in 1971

 

For additional information, please contact: Deirdre Kane at dkane@uga.edu.

Founder's Award Nomination Form

The Founder's Award is presented to a faculty, staff, or community member who has made a significant and lasting contributions to the LGBT community at The University of Georgia.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

The Annette Hatton Student Leadership Award

Annette Hatton with Student

The Annette Hatton Student Leadership Award was established to honor the dedication and contributions of Annette Hatton, managing editor of The Georgia Review at the University of Georgia for over 23 years, co-founder of GLOBES (UGA's LGBT Fauclty/Staff Organization) in 1994, and also helped to found Athens Pride in 1998. Hatton served as the chair of GLOBES until 2008.

The purpose of this award is to recognizes an undergraduate or graduate student for their remarkable commitment to service in the LGBT community at The University of Georgia.

The award is presented to one student annually at Lavender Graduation, The LGBT Resource Center's annual graduation and recognition ceremony. 

The Annette Hatton Student Leadership Award Nomination Form

This award recognizes an undergraduate or graduate student for their remarkable commitment to service in the LGBT community at the University of Georgia. The recipient should be graduated between June 2017 and June 2018.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Lavender Graduation RSVP for Guests

 

Fill out my online form.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Lavender Graduation Speaker Application

 

Fill out my online form.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Lavender Graduation Registration Form for Graduates

Fill out my online form.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Lavender Graduation History

Three graduates at Lavender Graduation

2018
Keynote
: Raquel Willis
Raquel Willis is a writer, actvist, social media maven, and a graduate of the University of Georgia. 
Senior Student Speaker: Logan M. Riddle 
Graduates: 27
 
2017
Keynote: Dr. Erin Richman 
Erin Richman, is a University of Georgia alumna who currently serves as Associate Vice President within the Division of Student Services at Flordia State College at Jacksonville. 
Senior Student Speaker: Campbell Wilks
Graduate Student Speaker: Ciera Durden 
Graduates: 30
 
 
2016
Keynote: Ashland Johnson, Athlete Ally's Director of Policy and Campaigns 
Ashland Johnson, is a UGA Law School alumna who currently serves as the Director of Policy and Campaigns with Athlete Ally.  
Senior Student Speakers: Cindy Blair & Erica Lee
Graduates: 19
 
 
2015
Keynote: Dr. Michael Shutt, Interim Senior Director for the Center for Diversity and Inclusion at Emory University
Senior Student Speaker: Ciera Durden 
Graduates: 31
 
 
2013
Keynote: Dr. Dawn Bennett-Alexander, Associate Professor of Employment Law & Legal Studies in the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business
Dr. B-A is a fierce advocate who has made it her mission to live openly and dispel the myths and misconceptions about being a member of the LGBT community.
Senior Student Speaker: Raquel Willis 
Graduates: 22
 
 
2012
Keynote: Vandy Beth Glenn
Graduate of the Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication who was fired from her position as a legislative editor in the Georgia General Assembly and brought a federal case before the federal court for the Northen District of Georgia and later the federal Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, both of which ruled in her favor.
Senior Student Speaker: Jackson Anderson Stone 
Graduates: 26
 
 
2011
Keynote: Tyler Helms, Vice President - Group Account Director at Deutsch
Published writer, advocate, and community voice in the ongoing effort to raise awareness, education, and prevention of HIV/AIDS
Senior Student Speaker: Jessica Nicole Brand 
Graduates: 27
 
 
2009
Keynote: Diego Sanchez, Graduate of the Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication
First openly transgender staff on Capitol Hill.
Senior Student Speakers: Katherine Bernadette & Shawna Scott 
Graduates: 12
 
 
2008
Keynote: LeeAnn Jones, Partner with Powell Goldenstein LLC in Atlanta.
"Double Dawg" Alumna with an AB and JD from UGA.
Senior Student Speaker: Adam Thomas 
Graduates: 13
 
 
2007
Keynote: Vernon Wall, Former UGA staff member, author, and social justice educator.
Senior Student Speaker: Tiffany Holder
Graduates: 18
 
 
2006
Keynote: Cathy Woolard
UGA Graduate & first openly LGBT person elected in the State of Georgia.
Senior Student Speaker: Patrick Miller 
Graduates: 13
 
 
2005
Keynote: Patricia Cain
UGA Law School Graduate and author of Rainbow Rights.
Senior Student Speaker: Stephanie Papps & Gareth Griffin 
Graduates: 10

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Lavender Graduation

2017-2018 Lavender Graduates

2017-2018 Lavender Graduates

Lavender Graduation

April 27, 2019

Memorial Hall Ballroom 

2:00 PM


Lavender Graduation is a cultural celebration that acknowledges the achievements and contributions of LGBT students on UGA’s campus. Through this recognition, LGBT students are provided with a positive experience at the university, encouraging them to continue their connections to the university, other students, and other alumnus.

Graduating students, as well as alumni, have an opportunity to participate in the program and receive a Lavender Diploma as well as a gift from the Alumni Association. Two speakers: a student speaker and the keynote speaker, who is usually an accomplished and out LGBT alum, deliver addresses to the participants. The LGBT Resource Center and GLOBES recognize strong advocates for the LGBT community with the Founder’s Award and the Annette Hatton Outstanding Student Advocate Award. 

For more information about Lavender Graduation, email lgbtrc@uga.edu.

Lavender Graduation History

Emerging Student Leader Award Nomination Form

The Emerging Student Leader Award was established to recognize undergraduate students, with less than 60 credit hours, from the University of Georgia who have displayed a commitment to service and passion for enhancing the student experience for LGBT students on campus.

Annette Hatton Award

The purpose of this award is to honor Annette’s dedication and contributions and will be given annually at the LGBT Resource Center’s Lavender Graduation. The award recognizes a full-time student for their remarkable commitment to service in the LGBT community.

Founder's Award

This award honors a faculty, staff, or community member who has made a significant and lasting contribution to the University of Georgia LGBT community. The winner of this award is recognized each year at our annual Lavender Graduation.

Contact Us

706-583-4077
lgbtrc@uga.edu

221 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602

 

FAQs

Why should I participate in Lavender Graduation? 
This ceremony will acknowledge and celebrate your accomplishments and contributions to the UGA community, and serve as a farewell from the LGBT Resource Center.

Who can attend Lavender Graduation? 
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. In the past, faculty, staff, alumni, students, and friends and family of graduates have all attended. If you plan on attending, please RSVP.

Is this an actual graduation ceremony? 
No. This is a celebration of graduates’ accomplishments. It is held weeks prior to the university’s commencement ceremony.

Do I have to identify as LGBTQ to attend or participate? 
No. Lavender Graduation will celebrate the accomplishments of LGBTQ and ally students. All are welcome to attend.

Do I have to graduate this spring to participate?
No. If you graduated in December 2016, or plan to graduate in May, August, or December 2017, you may participate.

Do I need tickets to attend?
No. Tickets are not required.

Do I need to RSVP to attend?
We strongly encourage you to RSVP so that we can adequately accommodate all guests and graduates.

Dawgs Making It Better

Dawgs Making It Better Table Display

The Dawgs Making It Better Campaign was launched in October 2013 during Ally Visibility Week—a week dedicated to the increased visibility of allies to the LGBT community to help promote a more inclusive environment for LGBT and allied students at UGA. The three objectives of the Dawgs Making It Better campaign are to increase visibility of allies therefore creating a safer atmosphere for LGBT students at UGA; to implement a series of events to make resources for LGBT and allied students more accessible and to allow all students to more easily find supportive voices; and to encourage and educate allies to understand their power and responsibility as allies to the LGBT community.

Dawgs Making It Better 2018

October 12, 2018

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Tate Student Center Plaza 

Join The LGBT Resource Center and other UGA departments, offices, and student organizations for educational activities, photos, and more.

The LGBT Resource Center

Four students arm-in-arm

Mission Statement 

The mission of the LGBT Resource Center is to create an inclusive and sustainable space of self-discovery for the LGBT community within the University of Georgia. We support and affirm every student inclusive of sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, and expression. The LGBT Resource Center serves as a space by which all members of the University of Georgia community can engage and explore issues associated with sexual and gender identities. This mission is achieved by our commitment to an intersectional social justice framework, leadership development, and equity. 

 

Core Values 

Advocacy

Celebration

Community 

Education 

Engagement 

Leadership 

Welcome Letter from LGBT Resource Center Staff